The swine flu vaccine contains mercury

October 27, 2009

Thimerosal (or thiomersal) is a mercury-based preservative used in vaccines, consisting of approximately 50% mercury.  It has been removed from many of the childhood vaccines  but is still used in flu shots, which will be given to all adults including pregnant women.  Medical authorities persist in claiming mercury in vaccines is safe, despite evidence to the contrary. (Take a look at Dr Ayoub’s videos as a basic introduction and I’ll gradually provide other links over the coming weeks).

Thimerosal is listed as one of the ingredients in CSL’s swine flu vaccine (the suppliers of the vaccine in Australia) and also in the vaccines produced by other pharmaceutical companies for supply worldwide.

Mercury is also present in fish and amalgam fillings.

We are assured each of these exposures is safe but take a look at this clip to understand  how mercury produces brain damage even at very low levels.

CSL’s product information sheet for Panvax states there are 50 micrograms of thimerosal in each dose.  To give you some idea of the relative toxicity of that dosage take a look at one of the slides from Dr Ayoub’s presentation:

ppbmercury

Remembering that thimerosal comprises approximately 50% mercury we can see that Panvax’s 50 mcg  dose would contain about 25 mcg of mercury as per the above example.

In water two parts mercury per billion renders it unsafe to drink.  Toxic waste is considered 200 parts per billion.  Yet fish is deemed safe to consume around the  1000 ppb mark.  And vaccines dwarf other exposures with a whooping 50,000 parts per billion!  As Dr Ayoub say’s if the doctor dropped the vaccine on the floor it would be considered toxic waste yet we see fit to inject it into the human body.

CSL is currently testing a swine flu vaccine for children under 10 that will not contain thimerosal.  Which begs the obvious question:  if mercury in vaccines is so safe then why is there any need to produce a thimerosal-free vaccine for children?

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